July 9, 2019

In lack of idea to keep fit after 50 years?

In Quebec, we love sports. We "eat" hockey, "wait" for the return of the Nordiques, hopefully the Expos, support the Alouettes and the Montreal Impact, watch Formula 1, follow the Olympics, our tennis players... To this is added our pride in our Quebecers among the strongest in the world, Hugo Girard and Jean-François Caron, and the most talented like Mikaël Kingsbury.

Yes, we do love sports, but are we active? According to the results of a vast survey conducted by the Quebec Institute of Statistics, adults and young people do not move enough to obtain all the benefits of physical activity necessary for their health. Only half of the population participate in 30 minutes of physical activity each day and 1 in 3 people are rather sedentary.

I am a sports fan, but...

Despite this, we all know that being active reduces the risk of all kinds of life-threatening diseases (heart, stroke, cancer, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, etc.). When fighting cancer, it is normal not to feel a desire for exercise, especially when you are tired, sleeping poorly and not really seeing the end of the tunnel of immediate benefits on your well-being. However, being active before, during or after prostate cancer treatment can have a direct impact on your well-being, as it can:

  • improve your mood and self-esteem, reduce stress and anxiety
  • increase your energy level and your strength
  • help you sleep and concentrate
  • help you manage side effects like fatigue, nausea and constipation
  • help you improve your sexual vitality

That said, it is often mistakenly believed that you need to subscribe to a Gym or a class, buy a bike or other sophisticated equipment to get started, when in fact, walking your dog every day (if you have one) constitutes a physical activity in itself. The hardest part is often getting motivated and taking action. Need inspiration? Here are some tips you can incorporate into your everyday lifestyle.

At work

  • Take a walk every day during your lunch break
  • Replace some of your coffee breaks with a stretching break
  • Same thing when in front of your computer, take the opportunity to stretch-out

During your commute

  • Bike to work if you can
  • Park at a 15-minutes walk distance from your destination
  • Get off the bus or metro station one stop before your destination and walk the rest of the way
  • Boycott escalators and elevators

When shopping

  • Park your car as far as possible in the parking lot
  • Flex your arms and wrists when carrying your grocery bags
  • Use a basket with handles (not a cart) when buying few items
  • Avoid takeout or ordering in

At home

  • Increase your usual tempo when house cleaning: more vigorous, faster movements
  • Do circular movements when cleaning, alternating hands
  • Mow your lawn (not with a tractor, obviously), pick up your dead leaves, take care of your garden and flowers, wash your car, etc. All these activities require energy and work your muscles.

Your free time

  • Take note of what fills up your free time. Ask yourself if you move enough during your free time. If the answer is no, look for an activity that will make you move more but that will be especially pleasant for you: is it fishing, hunting, bowling, dancing, yoga, swimming, hiking, skiing, etc.? It's for you to find out!

A quiz that gives ideas

You want to try something new this summer or this fall? Answer a few short questions about your lifestyle to find an activity that's right for you! Take the quiz here (in French only).

The latest PROCURE news that might interest you
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Sources and references
Canada's Physical Activity Guide for Healthy Active Living

Written by PROCURE. © All rights reserved - 2019

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